Wet MD, Macular Pucker, and Cataract Diagnosis

About five years ago I was diagnosed with epiretinal membrane (macular pucker) in my right eye.

Amsler grid test

Two years ago, after I turned 54. I started having blurred vision in my left eye, so I decided to do the Amsler grid test and noticed there was a pucker on the grid similar to the right eye. I check the grid daily, and a few weeks later I noticed the pucker was gone but the center of the grid was dark and blurred.

Wet macular degeneration diagnosis

I went into a bit of shock and called my specialist's office. After doing her tests and eye scans she said "I am so sorry to say you have wet macular degeneration in your left eye."

She sent me to Iris Eye Institute at the hospital to double-check and see if I would be eligible for injections. Unfortunately, there was nothing they could do to help my left eye. My central vision was gone.

New cataract diagnosis

This year I was diagnosed with a right eye cataract and the right eye macular pucker. I don't know what's next! I'm a bit scared of going blind. My doctor advised me that the next year will be tough because of the two conditions affecting the same eye. I'm not sure if I will be eligible for cataract surgery. The big question is, will I get wet MD or dry MD in my not-so-good right eye.

Still trying to do things I love

I am trying to do the things I love to do, like sewing. I know I will have to give up driving soon. I do very short trips to the grocery store and back home once every two weeks.

I wear a fit-over Solar Shield and I wear a wide brim hat to help with the sun and glare when doing my gardening and I wear an amber-colored lens for watching TV.

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