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An open medicine cabinet shows the contents illuminated by small lights on the sides of the shelves.

Inner Cabinet Lighting - a Must Have!

I was recharging one of my mini drawer lights today when I realized I hadn’t told any of you about them.

Vision loss essentials

I have come to rely on them in different places. So let me tell you about these wonderful mini lights (ALLSEES Mini-Rechargeable Lights). They are the perfect thing for those of us who are finding the world getting a bit darker as our macular degeneration progresses

I found a package of four of these amazing inventions quite a while ago at Costco. They’re also available on Amazon. My blind friend was with me and bought a package, as well. We’ve since both wondered how we ever managed without them.

The perfect lights for cupboards and drawers

They’re tiny, at just over 2 1/2 inches x 1 1/2 inches and less than 1/2 an inch deep, but emit quite a powerful light for their size. It’s also a warm light, at 3000 kelvin. They come with a USB charging cable which charges them in about 1 1/2 to  2 hours. Mine last a few months on a charge. Just open the drawer or door and they light up automatically.

Low vision tips and tricks

My friend has put two of them in her filing cabinet drawers, and the other two are in her kitchen cabinets. We’ll probably be getting her more so she can have one in each cupboard, as well as in her jewelry box. The reason I wanted them was to light up the corner cupboard with its turntables, and they work even better than I expected. Can you tell I love these little lights?

Light placement for low vision

There is an adhesive magnetic bar that I adhered to the underside of the counter for the top shelf and to the side for the bottom shelf. When I open the door they light up everything on both shelves. Another lights up that black hole under the kitchen sink. The fourth went in the bathroom medicine cabinet which for some unknown reason opens away from the light. When arthritis wakes me up and I  need to get something from the medicine cabinet, I use this little light to find the correct bottle instead of turning on the light and making it even more difficult to get back to sleep.

As long as the sensor is covered, the light stays off, and it only needs to be within a few inches of the cupboard door for the sensor to work.

Help in the dark

A big plus is that the magnetic bar is attached to the cupboard, but the lights are just attached by the magnet, so they pop off when you need the extra bit of light to check the directions on a package.  My kitchen has a narrow pantry that is full counter depth, so I can shine one of these into the very back to make sure I’m getting out what I want. I don’t need to keep a flashlight in the kitchen drawer anymore. I’m lucky that the drawers in my kitchen are situated where they get decent light - for now. If macular degeneration makes my world any darker, I’ll be putting one in each.

My next ones will go in my closets so I can differentiate between the dark colors without needing to take a garment to the window.

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